AESOP'S FABLES

The Man with Two Wives – AESOP’S FABLES (yield to all and you will soon have nothing to yield / those who seek to please everybody please nobody)

In ancient times, when men by law

Might marry several wives,

One man had two, who were at war

In daily wrangling lives.

Continue reading “The Man with Two Wives – AESOP’S FABLES (yield to all and you will soon have nothing to yield / those who seek to please everybody please nobody)”

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AESOP'S FABLES

The Thirsty Crow – AESOP’S FABLES (little by little does the trick / necessity is the mother of invention)


A crow was cursed with such a thirst

He feared that he would die.

When he beheld a pitcher filled

With water finger-high.

But this, though he might stretch and strain,

Was much too low for him to gain.

Continue reading “The Thirsty Crow – AESOP’S FABLES (little by little does the trick / necessity is the mother of invention)”

AESOP'S FABLES

Androcles and the Lion – AESOP’S FABLES (return favors and favors will be bestowed on you / gratitude is the sign of noble souls)

A thorn had pierced a lion’s foot;

And much it roared and wailed.

Just then a slave named Androcles

Approached and saw what ailed.

With pitying skill, he dared to draw

The sliver from the lion’s paw.

Continue reading “Androcles and the Lion – AESOP’S FABLES (return favors and favors will be bestowed on you / gratitude is the sign of noble souls)”

AESOP'S FABLES

The Hares and the Frogs – AESOP’S FABLES (however unfortunate we may think we are there is always someone worse off than ourselves / our own are not the only troubles)


“Alas! Alas!” exclaimed the hares,

“We live in trembling dread

Of men and foxes, wolves and bears –

We would be better dead!”

Continue reading “The Hares and the Frogs – AESOP’S FABLES (however unfortunate we may think we are there is always someone worse off than ourselves / our own are not the only troubles)”

AESOP'S FABLES

The Travelers and the Bear – AESOP’S FABLESĀ (never trust a friend who leaves you when trouble approaches / misfortune is the test of true friendship)

Walking unarmed across a wooded waste,

Two travelers heard a bear.

One scrambled up a tree with frenzied haste;

The other could but stare,

Too old and plump to climb; then, with no sound,

Lay flat against a boulder, face to ground.

Continue reading “The Travelers and the Bear – AESOP’S FABLESĀ (never trust a friend who leaves you when trouble approaches / misfortune is the test of true friendship)”