All About Nursing · CNE self study · Nursing Continue Education

Cystic Fibrosis (Reading & Sharing Part 2)

Bronchiectasis develops early in the course of cystic fibrosis, being detectable in infants as young as 10 weeks of age, and is persistent and progressive. Recent data reveal that neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid in early life is associated with early bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis.

Nursing Assessment

Continue reading “Cystic Fibrosis (Reading & Sharing Part 2)”
All About Nursing · CNE self study · Nursing Continue Education

Cystic Fibrosis (Reading & Sharing)

Systic fibrosis is an inherited autosomal recessive disease in which abnormally thick mucus affects the reproductive, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts. Cystic fibrosis causes respiratory disease, characterized by chronic infection, obstructive airway disease, and progressive decline in lung function. Death is most commonly the result of respiratory failure. The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis has increased to the mid-30s as a result of advances in treatment. Adult palliative care providers will be caring for more patient with cystic fibrosis as life expectancy of these patients continues to increase.

Continue reading “Cystic Fibrosis (Reading & Sharing)”
All About Nursing · Blog Reading & Sharing · Hospice & Palliative Care

Hospice – Eligibility (Reading & Sharing)

Hospice is an all-encompassing service available for patients with a prognosis under 6 months. Under the Medicare hospice benefit, patients eligible for hospice are greater than 65 years or receiving Medicare disability payments. At the start of care, two physicians must sign a statement certifying that the patient’s life expectancy is six months or less based on their best estimate of the patient’s medical prognosis. While hospice benefit was originally designed for Medicare recipients, most insurance providers cover hospice care for patients not eligible for Medicare. But hospice eligibility depends on more than only a physician determining a prognosis of six months or less until death.

Continue reading “Hospice – Eligibility (Reading & Sharing)”
All About Nursing · Hospice & Palliative Care · Nursing Continue Education

Palliative Care (宁养服务)

Palliative care is available to acutely ill patients, may be provided along with disease-specific, life-prolonging treatment. Meticulous attention to be prevention and relief of pain and other burdensome symptoms is a basic part of quality palliative care. Yet, comprehensive palliative care includes much more. Psychosocial and spiritual care, counseling, and guidance in choosing among treatment options, and assisting with practical support for patients and caregivers are all equally fundamental components of comprehensive palliative care. It is critical to stress that palliative care should be provided from the time of diagnosis of a serious, debilitating, or life-limiting illness. Palliative care should be an integral part of healthcare aimed to achieve best possible outcomes including optimal quality of life, function, and opportunities for personal growth across the life span. Palliative care can and should be provided along with any disease-modifying treatments. And, yes, for some people with advanced illness, palliative care may be the main focus of care.

寧養服務適用於任何人——無論什麼年齡, 種族, 文化, 背景或宗教, 而且大多數服務是免費的。您可以在病情的任何階段使用寧養服務,這並不僅僅是為生命即將到達終點的人而設。使用寧養服務並不意味著生命沒有希望,您已經“放棄”或您的家庭不在乎您。您可以在接受寧養服務的同時繼續治療。

Continue reading “Palliative Care (宁养服务)”
All About Nursing

Is laughter good for your health?

As soon as you give way to laughter, electrical impulses are triggered by nerves in your brain, which set off chemical reactions there and in other parts of the body. Your endocrine (glandular) system orders your brain to secrete its natural tranquilizers and relieve pain. Other substances released in the wake of laughter aid digestion, while others make the arteries contract and relax, improving blood flow (except for patients with asthma), and possibly alleviating high blood pressure. To say laughter is the best remedy for what all you are going too far, but if you call it good medicine, few doctors will disagree.

Is Laughter Good for Your Health?